News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalist Career

Job Description: Narrate or write news stories, reviews, or commentary for print, broadcast, or other communications media such as newspapers, magazines, radio, or television. May collect and analyze information through interview, investigation, or observation.


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News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalist Career

What News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalists do:

  • Arrange interviews with people who can provide information about a story.
  • Check reference materials, such as books, news files, or public records, to obtain relevant facts.
  • Determine a published or broadcasted story's emphasis, length, and format and organize material accordingly.
  • Discuss issues with editors to establish priorities or positions.
  • Establish and maintain relationships with individuals who are credible sources of information.
  • Receive assignments or evaluate leads or tips to develop story ideas.
  • Report news stories for publication or broadcast, describing the background and details of events.
  • Report on specialized fields such as medicine, green technology, environmental issues, science, politics, sports, arts, consumer affairs, business, religion, crime, or education.
  • Research a story's background information to provide complete and accurate information.
  • Review written, audio, or video copy and correct errors in content, grammar, or punctuation, following prescribed editorial style and formatting guidelines.
  • Revise work to meet editorial approval or to fit time or space requirements.
  • Analyze and interpret news and information received from various sources to broadcast the information.
  • Communicate with readers, viewers, advertisers, or the general public via mail, email, or telephone.
  • Investigate breaking news developments, such as disasters, crimes, or human-interest stories.
  • Review and evaluate notes taken about news events to isolate pertinent facts and details.
  • Select material most pertinent to presentation, and organize this material into appropriate formats.
  • Gather information and develop perspectives about news subjects through research, interviews, observation, and experience.
  • Examine news items of local, national, and international significance to determine topics to address, or obtain assignments from editorial staff members.
  • Write commentaries, columns, or scripts, using computers.
  • Develop ideas or material for columns or commentaries by analyzing and interpreting news, current issues, or personal experiences.
  • Conduct taped or filmed interviews or narratives.
  • Coordinate and serve as an anchor on news broadcast programs.
  • Present news stories, and introduce in-depth videotaped segments or live transmissions from on-the-scene reporters.
  • Photograph or videotape news events.
  • Transmit news stories or reporting information from remote locations, using equipment such as satellite phones, telephones, fax machines, or modems.
  • Write online blog entries that address news developments or offer additional information, opinions, or commentary on news events.
  • Write columns, editorials, commentaries, or reviews that interpret events or offer opinions.
  • Present live or recorded commentary via broadcast media.
  • Take pictures or video and process them for inclusion in a story.
  • Assign stories to other reporters or duties to production staff.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People - Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others - Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.

Developing and Building Teams - Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information - Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.

Coaching and Developing Others - Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills.

Holland Code Chart for a News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalist