Harness Maker Career

Job Description: Construct, decorate, or repair leather and leather-like products, such as luggage, shoes, and saddles.

*A job as a Harness Maker falls under the broader career category of Shoe and Leather Workers and Repairers. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Harness Maker Career

What Harness Makers do:

  • Construct, decorate, or repair leather products according to specifications, using sewing machines, needles and thread, leather lacing, glue, clamps, hand tools, and/or rivets.
  • Align and stitch or glue materials such as fabric, fleece, leather, or wood, in order to join parts.
  • Cut out parts following patterns or outlines, using knives, shears, scissors, or machine presses.
  • Dye, soak, polish, paint, stamp, stitch, stain, buff, or engrave leather or other materials to obtain desired effects, decorations, or shapes.
  • Select materials and patterns, and trace patterns onto materials to be cut out.
  • Drill or punch holes; then insert or attach metal rings, handles, and fastening hardware such as buckles.
  • Check the texture, color, and strength of leather to ensure that it is adequate for a particular purpose.
  • Repair and recondition leather products such as trunks, luggage, shoes, saddles, belts, purses, and baseball gloves.
  • Attach accessories or ornamentation to decorate or protect products.
  • Cut, insert, position, and secure paddings, cushioning, and/or linings, using stitches or glue.
  • Inspect articles for defects, and remove damaged or worn parts, using hand tools.
  • Read prescriptions or specifications, and take measurements to establish the type of product to be made, using calipers, tape measures, or rules.
  • Draw patterns, using measurements, designs, plaster casts, or customer specifications, and position or outline patterns on work pieces.
  • Re-sew seams, and replace handles and linings of suitcases or handbags.
  • Estimate the costs of requested products or services such as custom footwear or footwear repair, and receive payment from customers.
  • Place shoes on lasts to remove soles and heels, using knives and/or pliers.
  • Cement, nail, or sew soles and heels to shoes.
  • Dress and otherwise finish boots or shoes, as by trimming the edges of new soles and heels to the shoe shape.
  • Stretch shoes, first dampening parts; then inserting and twisting parts, using an adjustable stretcher.
  • Repair or replace soles, heels, and other parts of footwear, using sewing, buffing and other shoe repair machines, materials, and equipment.
  • Clean and polish shoes.
  • Attach insoles to shoe lasts, affix shoe uppers, and apply heels and outsoles.
  • Make, modify, and repair orthopedic or therapeutic footwear according to doctors' prescriptions, or modify existing footwear for people with foot problems and special needs.
  • Shape shoe heels with a knife, and sand them on a buffing wheel for smoothness.
  • Nail heel and toe cleats onto shoes.
  • Measure customers for fit, and discuss with them the type of footwear to be made, recommending details such as leather quality.
  • Prepare inserts, heel pads, and lifts from casts of customers' feet.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Controlling Machines and Processes - Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material - Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People - Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Holland Code Chart for a Harness Maker

 

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