Seamstress Career

Job Description: Repair tears, holes, and other defects in fabrics, such as draperies, linens, parachutes, and tents.

*A job as a Seamstress falls under the broader career category of Fabric Menders, Except Garment. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Seamstress Career

What Seamstresss do:

  • Patch holes, sew tears and ripped seams, or darn defects in items, using needles and thread or sewing machines.
  • Trim edges of cut or torn fabric, using scissors or knives, and stitch trimmed edges together.
  • Spread out articles or materials and examine them for holes, tears, worn areas, and other defects.
  • Measure and hem curtains, garments, and canvas coverings to size, using tape measures.
  • Operate sewing machines to restitch defective seams, sew up holes, or replace components of fabric articles.
  • Stamp grommets into canvas, using mallets and punches or eyelet machines.
  • Repair holes by weaving thread over them, using needles.
  • Sew labels and emblems onto articles for identification.
  • Check repaired and repacked survival equipment to ensure that it meets specifications.
  • Clean stains from fabric or garments, using spray guns and cleaning fluid.
  • Replace defective shrouds, and splice connections between shrouds and harnesses, using hand tools.
  • Pull knots to the wrong sides of garments, using hooks.
  • Sew fringe, tassels, and ruffles onto drapes and curtains, and buttons and trimming onto garments.
  • Re-knit runs and replace broken threads, using latch needles.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Controlling Machines and Processes - Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information - Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People - Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material - Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

Developing and Building Teams - Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Coaching and Developing Others - Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Holland Code Chart for a Seamstress

 

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