Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Product Career

Job Description: Sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers where technical or scientific knowledge is required in such areas as biology, engineering, chemistry, and electronics, normally obtained from at least 2 years of post-secondary education.

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Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Product Career

What Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products do:

  • Answer customers' questions about products, prices, availability, or credit terms.
  • Contact new or existing customers to discuss how specific products or services can meet their needs.
  • Complete expense reports, sales reports, or other paperwork.
  • Collaborate with colleagues to exchange information, such as selling strategies or marketing information.
  • Inform customers of estimated delivery schedules, service contracts, warranties, or other information pertaining to purchased products.
  • Attend sales or trade meetings or read related publications to obtain information about market conditions, business trends, environmental regulations, or industry developments.
  • Identify prospective customers using business directories, leads from existing clients, participation in organizations, or trade show or conference attendance.
  • Quote prices, credit terms, or other bid specifications.
  • Visit establishments to evaluate needs or to promote product or service sales.
  • Prepare sales presentations or proposals to explain product specifications or applications.
  • Negotiate prices or terms of sales or service agreements.
  • Emphasize product features based on analyses of customers' needs and on technical knowledge of product capabilities and limitations.
  • Verify that delivery schedules meet project deadlines.
  • Select or assist customers in selecting products based on customer needs, product specifications, and applicable regulations.
  • Advise customers on product usage to improve production.
  • Maintain customer records, using automated systems.
  • Provide customers with ongoing technical support.
  • Study documentation or other information for new scientific or technical products.
  • Prepare and submit sales contracts for orders.
  • Stock or distribute resources, such as samples or promotional or educational materials.
  • Compute customer's installation or production costs and estimate savings from new services, products, or equipment.
  • Demonstrate the operation or use of technical or scientific products.
  • Consult with engineers regarding technical problems with products.
  • Initiate sales campaigns to meet sales and production expectations.
  • Verify accuracy of materials lists.
  • Verify customer credit ratings.
  • Provide feedback to product design teams so that products can be tailored to clients' needs.
  • Present information to customers about the energy efficiency or environmental impact of scientific or technical products.
  • Arrange for installation and testing of products or machinery.
  • Visit establishments, such as pharmacies, to determine product sales.
  • Inform customers about issues related to responsible use and disposal of products, such as waste reduction or product or byproduct recycling or disposal.
  • Sell service contracts for technical or scientific products.
  • Sell technical and scientific products that are environmentally sound or designed for environmental remediation.
  • Obtain building blueprints or specifications for use by engineering departments in bid preparations.
  • Appraise equipment to determine contract terms or trade-in values.
  • Research and convey information to customers about tax benefits or government rebates associated with energy-efficient scientific or technical products, such as solar panels.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Selling or Influencing Others - Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Developing Objectives and Strategies - Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Performing Administrative Activities - Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others - Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.

Provide Consultation and Advice to Others - Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Holland Code Chart for a Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Product