Registration Officer Career

Job Description: Draft agendas and bylaws for town or city council; record minutes of council meetings; answer official correspondence; keep fiscal records and accounts; and prepare reports on civic needs.

*A job as a Registration Officer falls under the broader career category of Municipal Clerks. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Registration Officer Career

What Registration Officers do:

  • Respond to requests for information from the public, other municipalities, state officials, or state and federal legislative offices.
  • Perform general office duties, such as taking or transcribing dictation, typing or proofreading correspondence, distributing or filing official forms, or scheduling appointments.
  • Research information in the municipal archives upon request of public officials or private citizens.
  • Plan and direct the maintenance, filing, safekeeping, and computerization of all municipal documents.
  • Record and edit the minutes of meetings and distribute to appropriate officials or staff members.
  • Issue public notification of all official activities or meetings.
  • Record and maintain all vital and fiscal records and accounts.
  • Prepare meeting agendas or packets of related information.
  • Maintain and update documents, such as municipal codes or city charters.
  • Issue various permits and licenses, such as marriage, fishing, hunting, or dog licenses, and collect appropriate fees.
  • Collaborate with other staff to assist in the development and implementation of goals, objectives, policies, or priorities.
  • Prepare ordinances, resolutions, or proclamations so that they can be executed, recorded, archived, or distributed.
  • Coordinate or maintain office tracking systems for correspondence or follow-up actions.
  • Perform budgeting duties, such as assisting in budget preparation, expenditure review, or budget administration.
  • Perform contract administration duties, assisting with bid openings or the awarding of contracts.
  • Represent municipalities at community events or serve as liaisons on community committees.
  • Participate in the administration of municipal elections, such as preparation or distribution of ballots, appointment or training of election officers, or tabulation or certification of results.
  • Process claims against the municipality, maintaining files and log of claims, and coordinate claim response and handling with municipal claims administrators.
  • Serve as a notary of the public.
  • Prepare reports on civic needs.
  • Provide assistance with events, such as police department auctions of abandoned automobiles.
  • Develop or conduct orientation programs for candidates for political office.
  • Provide assistance to persons with disabilities in reaching less accessible areas of municipal facilities.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Performing Administrative Activities - Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others - Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Training and Teaching Others - Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

Monitoring and Controlling Resources - Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Assisting and Caring for Others - Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People - Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

Staffing Organizational Units - Recruiting, interviewing, selecting, hiring, and promoting employees in an organization.

Developing and Building Teams - Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.

Provide Consultation and Advice to Others - Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.

Holland Code Chart for a Registration Officer