Generator Mechanic Career

Job Description: Repair, maintain, or install electric motors, wiring, or switches.

*A job as a Generator Mechanic falls under the broader career category of Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Generator Mechanic Career

What Generator Mechanics do:

  • Disassemble defective equipment so that repairs can be made, using hand tools.
  • Record repairs required, parts used, and labor time.
  • Inspect and test equipment to locate damage or worn parts and diagnose malfunctions, or read work orders or schematic drawings to determine required repairs.
  • Repair and rebuild defective mechanical parts in electric motors, generators, and related equipment, using hand tools and power tools.
  • Lubricate moving parts.
  • Measure velocity, horsepower, revolutions per minute (rpm), amperage, circuitry, and voltage of units or parts to diagnose problems, using ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, and other testing devices.
  • Scrape and clean units or parts, using cleaning solvents and equipment such as buffing wheels.
  • Solder, wrap, and coat wires to ensure proper insulation.
  • Read service guides to find information needed to perform repairs.
  • Adjust working parts, such as fan belts, contacts, and springs, using hand tools and gauges.
  • Inspect electrical connections, wiring, relays, charging resistance boxes, and storage batteries, following wiring diagrams.
  • Weld, braze, or solder electrical connections.
  • Reassemble repaired electric motors to specified requirements and ratings, using hand tools and electrical meters.
  • Rewire electrical systems, and repair or replace electrical accessories.
  • Assemble electrical parts such as alternators, generators, starting devices, and switches, following schematic drawings and using hand, machine, and power tools.
  • Lift units or parts such as motors or generators, using cranes or chain hoists, or signal crane operators to lift heavy parts or subassemblies.
  • Remove and replace defective parts such as coil leads, carbon brushes, and wires, using soldering equipment.
  • Maintain stocks of parts.
  • Sharpen tools such as saws, picks, shovels, screwdrivers, and scoops, either manually or by using bench grinders and emery wheels.
  • Clean cells, cell assemblies, glassware, leads, electrical connections, and battery poles, using scrapers, steam, water, emery cloths, power grinders, or acid.
  • Reface, ream, and polish commutators and machine parts to specified tolerances, using machine tools.
  • Hammer out dents and twists in tools and equipment.
  • Test equipment for overheating, using speed gauges and thermometers.
  • Test battery charges, and replace or recharge batteries as necessary.
  • Verify and adjust alignments and dimensions of parts, using gauges and tracing lathes.
  • Test conditions, fluid levels, and specific gravities of electrolyte cells, using voltmeters, hydrometers, and thermometers.
  • Steam-clean polishing and buffing wheels to remove abrasives and bonding materials, and spray, brush, or recoat surfaces as necessary.
  • Repair and operate battery-charging equipment.
  • Set machinery for proper performance, using computers.
  • Cut and form insulation, and insert insulation into armature, rotor, or stator slots.
  • Inspect batteries for structural defects such as dented cans, damaged carbon rods and terminals, and defective seals.
  • Drain and filter transformer oil and refill transformers with oil until coils are submerged.
  • Rewind coils on cores in slots, or make replacement coils, using coil-winding machines.
  • Clean, rinse, and dry transformer cases, using boiling water, scrapers, solvents, hoses, and cloths.
  • Add water or acid to battery cell solutions to obtain specified concentrations.
  • Pour compounds into transformer-case terminal openings to seal out moisture.
  • Position and level battery cells, anodes, or cathodes, using hoists or leveling jacks, or signal other workers to perform positioning and leveling.
  • Seal joints with putty, mortar, and asbestos, using putty extruders and knives.
  • Bolt porcelain insulators to wood parts to assemble hot stools.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment - Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material - Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment - Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Controlling Machines and Processes - Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Training and Teaching Others - Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People - Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Provide Consultation and Advice to Others - Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.

Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment - Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

Coaching and Developing Others - Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills.

Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others - Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information - Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment - Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Selling or Influencing Others - Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.

Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates - Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Performing Administrative Activities - Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.

Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Developing and Building Teams - Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Monitoring and Controlling Resources - Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.

Holland Code Chart for a Generator Mechanic