Document Examiner Career

Job Description: Perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring knowledge of office systems and procedures. Clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments and may include a combination of answering telephones, bookkeeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing.

*A job as a Document Examiner falls under the broader career category of Office Clerks, General. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Document Examiner Career

What Document Examiners do:

  • Operate office machines, such as photocopiers and scanners, facsimile machines, voice mail systems, and personal computers.
  • Compute, record, and proofread data and other information, such as records or reports.
  • Answer telephones, direct calls, and take messages.
  • Communicate with customers, employees, and other individuals to answer questions, disseminate or explain information, take orders, and address complaints.
  • Compile, copy, sort, and file records of office activities, business transactions, and other activities.
  • Maintain and update filing, inventory, mailing, and database systems, either manually or using a computer.
  • Review files, records, and other documents to obtain information to respond to requests.
  • Inventory and order materials, supplies, and services.
  • Open, sort, and route incoming mail, answer correspondence, and prepare outgoing mail.
  • Deliver messages and run errands.
  • Troubleshoot problems involving office equipment, such as computer hardware and software.
  • Type, format, proofread, and edit correspondence and other documents, from notes or dictating machines, using computers or typewriters.
  • Complete work schedules, manage calendars, and arrange appointments.
  • Train other staff members to perform work activities, such as using computer applications.
  • Complete and mail bills, contracts, policies, invoices, or checks.
  • Collect, count, and disburse money, do basic bookkeeping, and complete banking transactions.
  • Prepare meeting agendas, attend meetings, and record and transcribe minutes.
  • Process and prepare documents, such as business or government forms and expense reports.
  • Count, weight, measure, or organize materials.
  • Make travel arrangements for office personnel.
  • Monitor and direct the work of lower-level clerks.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Performing Administrative Activities - Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Assisting and Caring for Others - Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Monitoring and Controlling Resources - Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Controlling Machines and Processes - Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

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