Deep Sea Diver Career

Job Description: Use nets, fishing rods, traps, or other equipment to catch and gather fish or other aquatic animals from rivers, lakes, or oceans, for human consumption or other uses. May haul game onto ship.

*A job as a Deep Sea Diver falls under the broader career category of Fishers and Related Fishing Workers. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Deep Sea Diver Career

What Deep Sea Divers do:

  • Load and unload vessel equipment and supplies, by hand or using hoisting equipment.
  • Put fishing equipment into the water and anchor or tow equipment, according to the fishing method used.
  • Wash decks, conveyors, knives, and other equipment, using brushes, detergents, and water.
  • Maintain engines, fishing gear, and other on-board equipment; and perform minor repairs.
  • Return undesirable or illegal catches to the water.
  • Pull and guide nets, traps, and lines onto vessels, by hand or using hoisting equipment.
  • Steer vessels and operate navigational instruments.
  • Remove catches from fishing equipment and measure them to ensure compliance with legal size.
  • Connect accessories such as floats, weights, flags, lights, or markers to nets, lines, or traps.
  • Signal other workers to move, hoist, and position loads.
  • Interpret weather and vessel conditions to determine appropriate responses.
  • Oversee the purchase of supplies, gear, and equipment such as fuel, netting, and cables.
  • Transport fish to processing plants or to buyers.
  • Attach nets, slings, hooks, blades, and/or lifting devices to cables, booms, hoists, and/or dredges.
  • Sort, pack, and store catch in holds with salt and ice.
  • Locate fish, using fish-finding equipment.
  • Compute positions and plot courses on charts to navigate vessels, using instruments such as compasses, sextants, and charts.
  • Direct fishing operations, and supervise fishing crew members.
  • Hire qualified crew members, and assign their duties.
  • Harvest marine life for human or animal consumption, using diving or dredging equipment, traps, barges, rods, reels, and/or tackle.
  • Record in logbooks specifics of fishing activities such as dates, harvest areas, yields, and weather and sea conditions.
  • Sell catches by contacting and negotiating with buyers or by sending catches to fish auctions.
  • Estimate costs of operations and plan fishing season budgets accordingly.
  • Plan fishing operations, establishing the fish to be sought, the fishing location, the method of capture, and the duration of the trip.
  • Stand lookout for schools of fish, and for steering and engine-room watches.
  • Operate rowboats, dinghies, and/or skiffs to transport fishers, divers, and/or sponge hookers; or to tow and position fishing equipment.
  • Monitor distribution of proceeds from sales of catches to ensure that crew members receive their prearranged portions.
  • Participate in wildlife management, disease control, and research activities.
  • Club or gaff large fish to enable hauling them into fishing vessel.
  • Share fishing expertise through activities such as writing for fishing magazines, hosting television shows, or testing and endorsing fishing equipment.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Controlling Machines and Processes - Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment - Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.

Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment - Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material - Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People - Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment - Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.

Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others - Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.

Training and Teaching Others - Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates - Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information - Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Holland Code Chart for a Deep Sea Diver

 

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