Classification Analyst Career

Job Description: Compute, classify, and record numerical data to keep financial records complete. Perform any combination of routine calculating, posting, and verifying duties to obtain primary financial data for use in maintaining accounting records. May also check the accuracy of figures, calculations, and postings pertaining to business transactions recorded by other workers.

*A job as a Classification Analyst falls under the broader career category of Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Classification Analyst Career

What Classification Analysts do:

  • Operate 10-key calculators, typewriters, and copy machines to perform calculations and produce documents.
  • Perform general office duties such as filing, answering telephones, and handling routine correspondence.
  • Check figures, postings, and documents for correct entry, mathematical accuracy, and proper codes.
  • Operate computers programmed with accounting software to record, store, and analyze information.
  • Comply with federal, state, and company policies, procedures, and regulations.
  • Classify, record, and summarize numerical and financial data to compile and keep financial records, using journals and ledgers or computers.
  • Access computerized financial information to answer general questions as well as those related to specific accounts.
  • Debit, credit, and total accounts on computer spreadsheets and databases, using specialized accounting software.
  • Reconcile or note and report discrepancies found in records.
  • Compile statistical, financial, accounting or auditing reports and tables pertaining to such matters as cash receipts, expenditures, accounts payable and receivable, and profits and losses.
  • Code documents according to company procedures.
  • Match order forms with invoices, and record the necessary information.
  • Receive, record, and bank cash, checks, and vouchers.
  • Calculate, prepare, and issue bills, invoices, account statements, and other financial statements according to established procedures.
  • Compare computer printouts to manually maintained journals to determine if they match.
  • Prepare bank deposits by compiling data from cashiers, verifying and balancing receipts, and sending cash, checks, or other forms of payment to banks.
  • Monitor status of loans and accounts to ensure that payments are up to date.
  • Reconcile records of bank transactions.
  • Compile budget data and documents, based on estimated revenues and expenses and previous budgets.
  • Calculate and prepare checks for utilities, taxes, and other payments.
  • Prepare purchase orders and expense reports.
  • Transfer details from separate journals to general ledgers or data processing sheets.
  • Prepare and process payroll information.
  • Prepare trial balances of books.
  • Perform financial calculations such as amounts due, interest charges, balances, discounts, equity, and principal.
  • Complete and submit tax forms and returns, workers' compensation forms, pension contribution forms, and other government documents.
  • Perform personal bookkeeping services.
  • Maintain inventory records.
  • Compute deductions for income and social security taxes.
  • Calculate costs of materials, overhead and other expenses, based on estimates, quotations and price lists.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Performing Administrative Activities - Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Monitoring and Controlling Resources - Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Training and Teaching Others - Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Assisting and Caring for Others - Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.

Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others - Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.

Holland Code Chart for a Classification Analyst

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