Carpet Cleaner Career

Job Description: Keep buildings in clean and orderly condition. Perform heavy cleaning duties, such as cleaning floors, shampooing rugs, washing walls and glass, and removing rubbish. Duties may include tending furnace and boiler, performing routine maintenance activities, notifying management of need for repairs, and cleaning snow or debris from sidewalk.

*A job as a Carpet Cleaner falls under the broader career category of Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Carpet Cleaner Career

What Carpet Cleaners do:

  • Clean building floors by sweeping, mopping, scrubbing, or vacuuming.
  • Service, clean, or supply restrooms.
  • Clean windows, glass partitions, or mirrors, using soapy water or other cleaners, sponges, or squeegees.
  • Gather and empty trash.
  • Notify managers concerning the need for major repairs or additions to building operating systems.
  • Follow procedures for the use of chemical cleaners and power equipment to prevent damage to floors and fixtures.
  • Dust furniture, walls, machines, or equipment.
  • Clean and polish furniture and fixtures.
  • Requisition supplies or equipment needed for cleaning and maintenance duties.
  • Mix water and detergents or acids in containers to prepare cleaning solutions, according to specifications.
  • Move heavy furniture, equipment, or supplies, either manually or by using hand trucks.
  • Steam clean or shampoo carpets.
  • Strip, seal, finish, and polish floors.
  • Set up, arrange, or remove decorations, tables, chairs, ladders, or scaffolding to prepare facilities for events, such as banquets or meetings.
  • Monitor building security and safety by performing tasks such as locking doors after operating hours or checking electrical appliance use to ensure that hazards are not created.
  • Remove snow from sidewalks, driveways, or parking areas, using snowplows, snow blowers, or snow shovels, or spread snow melting chemicals.
  • Drive vans, industrial trucks, or other vehicles required to travel to or to perform cleaning work.
  • Clean laboratory equipment, such as glassware or metal instruments, using solvents, brushes, rags, or power cleaning equipment.
  • Make adjustments or minor repairs to heating, cooling, ventilating, plumbing, or electrical systems.
  • Clean and restore building interiors damaged by fire, smoke, or water, using commercial cleaning equipment.
  • Mow or trim lawns or shrubbery, using mowers or hand or power trimmers, and clear debris from grounds.
  • Spray insecticides or fumigants to prevent insect or rodent infestation.
  • Clean chimneys, flues, and connecting pipes, using power or hand tools.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material - Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Controlling Machines and Processes - Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Assisting and Caring for Others - Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.

Developing and Building Teams - Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.

Holland Code Chart for a Carpet Cleaner