Call Center Operator Career

Job Description: Solicit donations or orders for goods or services over the telephone.

*A job as a Call Center Operator falls under the broader career category of Telemarketers. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Call Center Operator Career

What Call Center Operators do:

  • Explain products or services and prices, and answer questions from customers.
  • Obtain customer information such as name, address, and payment method, and enter orders into computers.
  • Deliver prepared sales talks, reading from scripts that describe products or services, in order to persuade potential customers to purchase a product or service or to make a donation.
  • Record names, addresses, purchases, and reactions of prospects contacted.
  • Adjust sales scripts to better target the needs and interests of specific individuals.
  • Contact businesses or private individuals by telephone in order to solicit sales for goods or services, or to request donations for charitable causes.
  • Maintain records of contacts, accounts, and orders.
  • Conduct client or market surveys in order to obtain information about potential customers.
  • Telephone or write letters to respond to correspondence from customers or to follow up initial sales contacts.
  • Answer telephone calls from potential customers who have been solicited through advertisements.
  • Schedule appointments for sales representatives to meet with prospective customers or for customers to attend sales presentations.
  • Obtain names and telephone numbers of potential customers from sources such as telephone directories, magazine reply cards, and lists purchased from other organizations.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Selling or Influencing Others - Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.

Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Performing Administrative Activities - Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.

Holland Code Chart for a Call Center Operator

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