Braze Operator Career

Job Description: Set up, operate, or tend welding, soldering, or brazing machines or robots that weld, braze, solder, or heat treat metal products, components, or assemblies. Includes workers who operate laser cutters or laser-beam machines.

*A job as a Braze Operator falls under the broader career category of Welding, Soldering, and Brazing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Braze Operator Career

What Braze Operators do:

  • Give directions to other workers regarding machine set-up and use.
  • Set up, operate, or tend welding machines that join or bond components to fabricate metal products or assemblies.
  • Load or feed workpieces into welding machines to join or bond components.
  • Correct problems by adjusting controls or by stopping machines and opening holding devices.
  • Turn and press knobs and buttons or enter operating instructions into computers to adjust and start welding machines.
  • Clean, lubricate, maintain, and adjust equipment to maintain efficient operation, using air hoses, cleaning fluids, and hand tools.
  • Record operational information on specified production reports.
  • Assemble, align, and clamp workpieces into holding fixtures to bond, heat-treat, or solder fabricated metal components.
  • Prepare metal surfaces or workpieces, using hand-operated equipment, such as grinders, cutters, or drills.
  • Remove completed workpieces or parts from machinery, using hand tools.
  • Read blueprints, work orders, or production schedules to determine product or job instructions or specifications.
  • Conduct trial runs before welding, soldering, or brazing and make necessary adjustments to equipment.
  • Lay out, fit, or connect parts to be bonded, calculating production measurements as necessary.
  • Inspect, measure, or test completed metal workpieces to ensure conformance to specifications, using measuring and testing devices.
  • Select, position, align, and bolt jigs, holding fixtures, guides, or stops onto machines, using measuring instruments and hand tools.
  • Set dials and timing controls to regulate electrical current, gas flow pressure, heating or cooling cycles, or shut-off.
  • Transfer components, metal products, or assemblies, using moving equipment.
  • Dress electrodes, using tip dressers, files, emery cloths, or dressing wheels.
  • Observe meters, gauges, or machine operations to ensure that soldering or brazing processes meet specifications.
  • Tend auxiliary equipment used in welding processes.
  • Start, monitor, and adjust robotic welding production lines.
  • Select torch tips, alloys, flux, coil, tubing, or wire, according to metal types or thicknesses, data charts, or records.
  • Add chemicals or materials to workpieces or machines to facilitate bonding or to cool workpieces.
  • Compute and record settings for new work, applying knowledge of metal properties, principles of welding, and shop mathematics.
  • Devise or build fixtures or jigs used to hold parts in place during welding, brazing, or soldering.
  • Mark weld points and positions of components on workpieces, using rules, squares, templates, or scribes.
  • Fill hoppers and position spouts to direct flow of flux or manually brush flux onto seams of workpieces.
  • Immerse completed workpieces into water or acid baths to cool and clean components.
  • Anneal finished workpieces to relieve internal stress.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material - Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Controlling Machines and Processes - Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People - Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment - Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Holland Code Chart for a Braze Operator

 

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