Band Instrument Repair Technician Career

Job Description: Repair percussion, stringed, reed, or wind instruments. May specialize in one area, such as piano tuning.

*A job as a Band Instrument Repair Technician falls under the broader career category of Musical Instrument Repairers and Tuners. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Band Instrument Repair Technician Career

What Band Instrument Repair Technicians do:

  • Play instruments to evaluate their sound quality and to locate any defects.
  • Repair or replace musical instrument parts and components, such as strings, bridges, felts, and keys, using hand and power tools.
  • Disassemble instruments and parts for repair and adjustment.
  • Reassemble instruments following repair, using hand tools and power tools and glue, hair, yarn, resin, or clamps, and lubricate instruments as necessary.
  • Inspect instruments to locate defects, and to determine their value or the level of restoration required.
  • Shape old parts and replacement parts to improve tone or intonation, using hand tools, lathes, or soldering irons.
  • Compare instrument pitches with tuning tool pitches in order to tune instruments.
  • Mix and measure glue that will be used for instrument repair.
  • Adjust string tensions to tune instruments, using hand tools and electronic tuning devices.
  • Make wood replacement parts, using woodworking machines and hand tools.
  • Polish instruments, using rags and polishing compounds, buffing wheels, or burnishing tools.
  • Repair cracks in wood or metal instruments, using pinning wire, lathes, fillers, clamps, or soldering irons.
  • String instruments, and adjust trusses and bridges of instruments to obtain specified string tensions and heights.
  • Refinish instruments to protect and decorate them, using hand tools, buffing tools, and varnish.
  • Solder posts and parts to hold them in their proper places.
  • Remove dents and burrs from metal instruments, using mallets and burnishing tools.
  • Remove drumheads by removing tension rods with drum keys and cutting tools.
  • Test tubes and pickups in electronic amplifier units, and solder parts and connections as necessary.
  • Align pads and keys on reed or wind instruments.
  • Repair breaks in percussion instruments such as drums and cymbals, using drill presses, power saws, glue, clamps, grinding wheels, or other hand tools.
  • Adjust felt hammers on pianos to increase tonal mellowness or brilliance, using sanding paddles, lacquer, or needles.
  • Cut out sections around cracks on percussion instruments to prevent cracks from advancing, using shears or grinding wheels.
  • Remove irregularities from tuning pins, strings, and hammers of pianos, using wood blocks or filing tools.
  • Clean, sand, and paint parts of percussion instruments to maintain their condition.
  • Assemble bars onto percussion instruments.
  • Refinish and polish piano cabinets or cases to prepare them for sale.
  • Replace xylophone bars and wheels.
  • Strike wood, fiberglass, or metal bars of instruments, and use tuned blocks, stroboscopes, or electronic tuners to evaluate tones made by instruments.
  • Deliver pianos to purchasers or to locations where they are to be used.
  • Place rim hoops back onto drum shells to allow new drumheads to dry and become taut.
  • Stretch drumheads over rim hoops and tuck them around and under the hoops, using hand tucking tools.
  • Wash metal instruments in lacquer-stripping and cyanide solutions in order to remove lacquer and tarnish.
  • Cut new drumheads from animal skins, using scissors, and soak drumheads in water to make them pliable.
  • Solder or weld frames of mallet instruments and metal drum parts.
  • Assemble and install new pipe organs and pianos in buildings.
  • Remove material from bars of percussion instruments to obtain specified tones, using bandsaws, sanding machines, machine grinders, or hand files and scrapers.
  • Travel to locations such as churches and concert halls to work on pipe-organs.
  • Adjust lips, reeds, or toe holes of organ pipes to regulate airflow and loudness of sound, using hand tools.
  • File metal reeds until their pitches correspond with standard tuning bar pitches.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material - Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment - Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People - Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Controlling Machines and Processes - Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).

Monitoring and Controlling Resources - Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.

Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information - Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.

Performing Administrative Activities - Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Selling or Influencing Others - Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others - Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.

Provide Consultation and Advice to Others - Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.

Training and Teaching Others - Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

Coaching and Developing Others - Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills.

Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

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