Accessioner Career

Job Description: Assist librarians by helping readers in the use of library catalogs, databases, and indexes to locate books and other materials; and by answering questions that require only brief consultation of standard reference. Compile records; sort and shelve books or other media; remove or repair damaged books or other media; register patrons; and check materials in and out of the circulation process. Replace materials in shelving area (stacks) or files. Includes bookmobile drivers who assist with providing services in mobile libraries.

*A job as an Accessioner falls under the broader career category of Library Technicians. The information on this page will generally apply to all careers in this category. We are still seeking more specific information about this career from experts in this field. If you can provide us with more information, .

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Accessioner Career

What Accessioners do:

  • Catalogue and sort books and other print and non-print materials according to procedure, and return them to shelves, files, or other designated storage areas.
  • Deliver and retrieve items throughout the library by hand or using pushcart.
  • Help patrons find and use library resources, such as reference materials, audiovisual equipment, computers and other electronic resources, and provide technical assistance when needed.
  • Answer routine telephone or in-person reference inquiries, referring patrons to librarians for further assistance, when necessary.
  • Reserve, circulate, renew, and discharge books and other materials.
  • Organize and maintain periodicals and reference materials.
  • Train other staff, volunteers or student assistants, and schedule and supervise their work.
  • Maintain and troubleshoot problems with library equipment including computers, photocopiers, and audiovisual equipment.
  • Provide assistance to teachers and students by locating materials and helping to complete special projects.
  • Process print and non-print library materials to prepare them for inclusion in library collections.
  • Check for damaged library materials such as books, or audiovisual equipment, and provide replacements or make repairs.
  • Compile and maintain records relating to circulation, materials, and equipment.
  • Verify bibliographical data for materials, including author, title, publisher, publication date, and edition.
  • Conduct reference searches, using printed materials and in-house and online databases.
  • Claim missing issues of periodicals and journals.
  • Compile data and create statistical reports on library usage.
  • Take actions to halt disruption of library activities by problem patrons.
  • Retrieve information from central databases for storage in a library's computer.
  • Review subject matter of materials to be classified, and select classification numbers and headings according to classification systems.
  • Enter and update patrons' records on computers.
  • Collect fines, and respond to complaints about fines.
  • Design, customize, and maintain databases, web pages, and local area networks.
  • Design posters and special displays to promote use of library facilities or specific reading programs at libraries.
  • Operate and maintain audiovisual equipment such as projectors, tape recorders, and videocassette recorders.
  • Process interlibrary loans for patrons.
  • Issue identification cards to borrowers.
  • Send out notices about lost or overdue books.
  • Collaborate with archivists to arrange for the safe storage of historical records and documents.
  • Order all print and non-print library materials, checking prices, figuring costs, preparing order slips, and making payments.
  • Prepare volumes for binding.
  • Compile bibliographies and prepare abstracts on subjects of interest to particular organizations or groups.
  • Plan and conduct children's programs, community outreach programs, and other specialized programs such as library tours.
  • Compose explanatory summaries of contents of books and other reference materials.
  • File catalog cards according to system used.

What work activities are most important?

Importance Activities

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates - Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge - Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events - Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

Getting Information - Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Processing Information - Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.

Handling and Moving Objects - Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.

Interacting With Computers - Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Making Decisions and Solving Problems - Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.

Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work - Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships - Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.

Documenting/Recording Information - Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings - Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.

Performing for or Working Directly with the Public - Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization - Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.

Analyzing Data or Information - Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others - Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.

Training and Teaching Others - Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

Performing General Physical Activities - Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.

Scheduling Work and Activities - Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.

Thinking Creatively - Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards - Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information - Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.

Holland Code Chart for an Accessioner